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Title page for ETD etd-08242010-134442


Type of Document Master's Thesis
Author Grant, Vernon Matthew
Author's Email Address blckft_boxer@yahoo.com
URN etd-08242010-134442
Title Effect of a structured exercise program on physical activity patterns and assessing relationships between accelerometry and strength and running performance characteristics in male, college students
Degree Master of Science
Department Health & Human Performance
Advisory Committee
Advisor Name Title
Blakely Brown Committee Chair
Keywords
  • physical activity
  • accelerometry
  • performance
  • body composition
Date of Defense 2010-08-05
Availability unrestricted
Abstract
The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a supervised exercise training program on physical activity (PA) patterns. A secondary objective of the study was to determine if accelerometers can predict variables associated with strength and running performance. A total of 79 adult, male, college students completed a 12 week exercise training program that consisted of pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, and running three hours per week. The subjects trained three days/week (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) and conducted a performance test (PT) every Wednesday. Physical activity (average daily time spent in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous PA), performance strength and running variables (pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, and 1.5 mile run time), and body composition (BC) (weight (kg), percent body fat (PBF), fat free mass (FFM;kg), and fat mass (FM;kg)) were assessed before and after 12 weeks of the exercise training program. Results showed the 12 week exercise training program had no effect on the average daily time (min) spent in sedentary, light, moderate or vigorous activity. There were significant positive correlations between average daily time spent in vigorous PA and pull-ups (p<.05), sit-ups (p<.01), and push-ups (p<.01). There were significant negative correlations between average daily time spent in moderate (p<.05) and vigorous (p<.01) PA and 1.5 mile run times. Additionally, there were significant negative correlations between BC and weight, PBF, and FM and pull-ups, sit-ups, and push-ups (p<.01). Data showed a a significant positive relationship between weight, PBF, and FM and 1.5 mile run time (p<.01). As expected, strength and running performance significantly improved in every area (p<0 .001) with an average gain of four pull-ups, 31 sit-ups, 15 push-ups, and a mean decrease of 30 seconds on the 1.5 mile run. The structured exercise intervention significantly improved strength and running performance characteristics, which included pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups and a 1.5 mile run time. The results from this study show that the 12 week exercise training program did not affect PA levels in the participants but PA (vigorous) and BC (weight, PBF, and FM) may be able to predict pull-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, and 1.5 mile run performance variables.
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Grant_Vernon_Thesis.pdf 301.84 Kb

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